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A Million Castaways
Blind Fish Series
Coming Home to Newfoundland
Flat Earth
Going to Ground
In Sight of Memory
Malu
Naked in the Road
Not Quite Dark
The Ray Series
Vested Interest
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A Million Castaways, my space colonization novel set in the near solar system and the dangers of corporate control of technology.

The Blind Fish Series, which begins with the novella Blind Fish: Locked in the Park is takes place underground where a small group struggle to survive. Blind Fish 2: Lost in the Tunnels details the next twenty years of life underground, including achievement and catastrophe.

Coming Home to Newfoundland, both an environmental treatise and a animal journey novel, this record of a moose journey is meant to enlighten and inspire.

Flat Earth, another science fiction about an ancient utopia and its return to Earth.

Going to Ground: The Search for Home, a road novel about a drifter who senses it's time to come in from the cold.

In Sight of Memory: The Legend of the Lost Colony, a science fiction novel about the desire to control and confront a loss of memory.

Malu, the novel about a cave girl whose people have survived into modern times.

Naked in the Road, a tale of a man's attempt to take back his life by going into the woods naked.

Not Quite Dark: A Post-Apocalyptic Adoption Story follows a man and the child he has rescued as they search for a perfect town in a world gone mad.

The Ray Series begins with In Light of Ray, a novel about despair and redemption, this story details a manís drift from the Vancouver streets and the emptiness of dead-end jobs to a choice between embracing community and connection or disappearing into a waiting squalor. In Working for Ray, Sam's slide into despair has been temporarily halted by Rikka, who saves him even as he saves her.

Vested Interest details the attempt by two people to put the gutted space programs back together only to find the asteroid Vesta is much more interesting than distant observations would indicate.
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